Faculty & Staff

Co-Director, Center for Development Economics and Policy
Co-Director, Center for Development Economics and Policy
Administrative Assistant, Center for Development Economics and Policy

Biographies

Douglas Almond

Douglas Almond is a Professor at Columbia´s School of International and Public Affairs (SIPA) and its Department of Economics. Almond is also a Research Associate at the National Bureau of Economic Research (NBER), co-directs Columbia's Center for Environmental Economics and Policy (CEEP), and is a visiting professor at Uppsala University in Sweden. Almond's research focuses on early childhood health, environmental economics, and China, where he studied the health effects of air pollution as a Fulbright scholar. Almond received his BA in Economics from Carleton College in Minnesota and Ph.D. in Economics from the University of California, Berkeley.

His CV and further information are available on his personal website.

Belinda Archibong

Belinda Archibong is an Assistant Professor of Economics at Barnard College, Columbia University. Her research areas include development economics, political economy, economic history, and environmental economics with an African regional focus. Her research investigates the role of historical institutions and environment in inequality of access to public services and the development of human capital. Some current research studies the effects of epidemics on gender gaps in human capital investment, the politics and economic burden of epidemic disease, and the impact of air pollution from gas flaring on human capital outcomes; with a focus on the ways in which institutions mitigate or exacerbate the impacts of climate change and environment on inequalities around gender and marginalized groups. Other works study the economics of prisons, the determinants of gender gaps in political participation, the links between taxation and public service provision and the drivers of gender gaps in labor markets in African countries. She is a faculty affiliate at Columbia University's Center for Development Economics and Policy (CDEP), The Earth Institute at Columbia University, Institute of African Studies, the Institute for Research in African-American Studies, the Columbia Population Research Center (CPRC), and the Center for Environmental Economics and Policy (CEEP).

She joined the Barnard Economics faculty in 2015 and received a B.A. in Economics/Philosophy and a Ph.D. in Sustainable Development from Columbia University. Her CV and further information can also be found on her personal website.

Jie Bai

Jie Bai is an Assistant Professor in Public Policy at Harvard Kennedy School. She received her Ph.D. in Economics from Massachusetts Institute of Technology in June 2016 and spent one year at Microsoft Research New England prior to joining HKS. Her research lies at the intersection between development, trade and industrial organization, focusing on microeconomic issues of firms in developing countries and emerging markets. Her past projects have examined firms’ incentive and ability to build a reputation for quality, collective reputational forces in export markets, the relationship between firm growth and corruption, and the impact of internal trade barriers among Chinese provinces on firms' export behavior. Her current ongoing work includes studying growth and reputation dynamics in global e-commerce platforms, technology transfer and knowledge spillovers in the Chinese auto industry, and quality upgrading of the Ugandan coffee sector.

Anja Benshaul-Tolonen

Anja Benshaul-Tolonen is an Assistant Professor of Economics at Barnard College, Columbia University. She works on economic development. Her recent work focuses on the local welfare effects of natural resource extraction in Africa, including employment, women’s empowerment, health and criminality. She teaches Development Economics, and Women in Development Economics at Barnard College.  Prof. Tolonen is an external research member at Oxford Center for Analysis of Resource Rich Economies (OxCarre), UNESCO has funded her research and she has consultancy experience from the World Bank. She received her Ph.D. from University of Gothenburg in 2015 and has been a visiting researcher at University of Oxford and University of California at Berkeley.

Additional information can be found on her web site.

Michael Best

Michael Best is an Assistant Professor of Economics at Columbia University. Michael's research focuses on tax evasion in developing countries and its implications for optimal tax policy and administration; the determinants of the effectiveness of public procurement in developing countries and the design of policies to improve it; and the effects of tax policy and the design of optimal tax policies in developed countries. Prior to joining Columbia, Michael was a Postdoctoral Fellow at the Stanford Institute for Economic Policy Research. Michael holds a PhD from the LSE and an M.Phil from the University of Oxford.

More information is available on his personal website.

Laura Boudreau

Laura Boudreau is an Assistant Professor of Economics at Columbia Business School. Her research focuses on organizational economics, labor economics, and development economics. Laura is especially interested in how the intersection of global supply chains with local institutions affect firms’ and workers’ outcomes and how labor market institutions affect economic development. Most of Laura’s research focuses on the apparel industry in South and Southeast Asia. Laura received her Ph.D. from the University of California, Berkeley. Prior to beginning her Ph.D., Laura was a staff member at the World Bank’s Financial and Private Sector Development Vice Presidency. 

Laura’s CV and additional information can be found on her personal website.

Glenn Denning

Glenn Denning is Professor of Professional Practice at Columbia University’s School of International and Public Affairs, where he directs the Master of Public Administration in Development Practice. He chairs the Earth Institute’s Practice Committee and is Senior Policy Advisor for the UN Sustainable Development Solutions Network. Denning has advised governments and other organizations on agriculture and food security in more than 50 countries. He served on the UN Millennium Project Hunger Task Force (2004-6), the Senior Steering Group of the UN High Level Task Force on the Global Food Security Crisis (2009-13), and the Technical Advisory Committee of the Global Agriculture and Food Security Program (2010-13). Prior to joining SIPA, Denning worked in international agricultural research for 24 years and held senior management positions at International Rice Research Institute and the World Agroforestry Centre. He received his B.Agr.Sc. and M.Agr.Sc. from the University of Queensland, his Ph.D. from the University of Reading, and his M.P.A. from the Harvard Kennedy School.

Alex Eble

Alex Eble is Assistant Professor of Economics and Education at Teachers College, Columbia University. He is an applied microeconomist, and his research focuses primarily on the economics of education in developing countries. He currently has active research projects in China, India, Gambia, and Guinea-Bissau, and can speak and read Mandarin Chinese. He received his his BA from Indiana University, Bloomington, MSc from the London School of Economics, and PhD in economics from Brown University.
 
His CV and further information are available on his personal website.

Sarah Holloway

Sarah Holloway is a serial social entrepreneur who has started a half dozen ventures in K-12 education including MOUSE and CSNYC. Sarah is a member of the SIPA faculty where she teaches Nonprofit Financial Management in the school’s core curriculum and Social Entrepreneurship. In addition to teaching, she runs SIPA’s Management Specialization – a set of courses and activities that support knowledge and skill building in nonprofit, for-profit, and social enterprise management, and is the Program Director of the Global EdTech program at SIPA.

Sarah is a board member of the NYC Foundation for Computer Science Education (CSNYC), The Armory Foundation, Mission Restore, Columbia Entrepreneurship, and FiveOne Labs. Sarah received a Bachelor's degree from Bowdoin College and a Masters in Public Administration (MPA) from SIPA.

Macartan Humphreys

Macartan Humphreys is a Professor of Political Science at Columbia University and director of the Institutions and Political Inequality unit at WZB Berlin. His ongoing research focuses on post-conflict development, ethnic politics, natural resource management, political authority and leadership, and democratic development with a current focus on the use of field experiments to study democratic decision-making in post-conflict and developing areas. He has conducted field research in Chad, Ghana, Haiti, Indonesia, Liberia, Mali, Sao Tome and Principe, Sierra Leone, Senegal, Uganda, and elsewhere. His work has appeared in the American Political Science Review, Journal of Development Economics, Science, and elsewhere. He has authored or coauthored books on ethnic politics, natural resource management, and game theory and politics. He is a former Executive Director of the Experiments in Governance and Politics research network and a former Trudeau fellow and scholar of the Harvard Academy. He received his Ph.D. from Harvard University in 2003.

His CV and further information are available on his personal website.

Hatice Karahan

Hatice Karahan is a Professor of Economics and the Head of the Department of Economics and Finance at Istanbul Medipol University. She received her Ph.D. degree in Economics from Syracuse University in 2006. She also holds BA and MA degrees from Boğazici University in Management and Economics, respectively. Karahan has worked as an economic advisor for the Turkish government and for the Scientific and Technological Research Council of Turkey (TUBITAK). She has also served for over a decade as a consultant for leading business associations in Turkey, including the Turkish Exporters' Assembly (TIM) and the Foreign Economic Relations Board of Turkey (DEIK). During the 2021-2022 academic year, she was a visiting scholar at Harvard University. Her research interests include macroeconomics, development economics, international political economy, women's studies and labor economics.

W. Bentley Macleod

W. Bentley MacLeod is Sami Mnaymneh Professor of Economics, Professor of International and Public Affairs, and an affiliated Law Faculty at Columbia University. He is a specialist in law, labor and contract economics, with a focus on how incentives are designed to take into account the complex interplay between reputation effects, market competition, and social norms. MacLeod has been a fellow of the Econometric Society since 2005 and a fellow of the Society of Labor Economists since 2012. His work has been published in the Rand Journal of Economics, the Quarterly Journal of Economics, the Journal of Economic Literature, and the American Economic Review, among others. MacLeod holds a B.A. (with distinction) and a M.Sc. in mathematics from Queen's University, Kingston, Canada and a Ph.D. in economics from the University of British Columbia, Vancouver, Canada.

His CV and further information are available on his personal website

Eugenia McGill

Eugenia (Jenny) McGill is a Senior Lecturer and Interim Director of the Economic and Political Development Concentration at Columbia University’s School of International and Public Affairs, where she directs the Workshop in Development Practice and teaches courses in methods for development practice and gender, politics and development. Her research interests include the social impacts of globalization, development interventions and development finance, particularly gender-related impacts. She also advises development organizations on gender and other social policy issues, and serves on the board of directors of East-West Management Institute and the oversight council of The School at Columbia University. Previously, she was a senior officer at Asian Development Bank and practiced law in New York and Hong Kong. She holds a JD from the University of Pennsylvania, MIA from SIPA, MAT from Northwestern and BA from Williams College.

Suresh Naidu

Suresh Naidu is Assistant Professor of Economics and International Affairs at Columbia University, with a joint appointment in the School of International and Public Affairs and the Department of Economics. His primary research area is political economy with a particular interest in markets and economic conflict in non-democratic environments. His CV is available on his website.

His current CDEP-affiliated research includes the cross-country economic effects of democratization, politics of trade in Haiti, a project on migrant worker contracts in the UAE, as well as ongoing research on the economic history of American labor markets.

José Antonio Ocampo

José Antonio Ocampo is Professor at the School of International and Public Affairs and Member of the Committee on Global Thought at Columbia University, Chair of the Committee for Development Policy of the United Nations Economic and Social Council (ECOSOC), and Chair of the Independent Commission for the Reform of International Corporate Taxation (ICRICT). He is currently the Minister of Finance of Colombia. He also teaches regularly at Universidad de los Andes and other Colombian universities. He has occupied numerous positions at the United Nations and his native Colombia, including UN Under-Secretary-General for Economic and Social Affairs, Executive Secretary of the UN Economic Commission for Latin America and the Caribbean (ECLAC), and Minister of Finance, Minister of Agriculture, Director of the National Planning Office of Colombia, and Member of the Board of Directors of Banco de la República (Colombia’s central bank). He has received numerous academic distinctions, including the 2012 Jaume Vicens Vives award of the Spanish Association of Economic History for the best book on Spanish or Latin American economic history, the 2008 Leontief Prize for Advancing the Frontiers of Economic Thought and the 1988 Alejandro Angel Escobar National Science Award of Colombia. He has published extensively on macroeconomic theory and policy, international financial issues, economic and social development, international trade, and Colombian and Latin American economic history.

 

Cristian (Kiki) Pop-Eleches

Cristian (Kiki) Pop-Eleches is an Associate Professor of Economics and International Affairs at Columbia's School of International and Public Affairs. He is an applied empirical economist whose research area is international education and health. His work explores how the quality and type of schools and school inputs affect educational and labor market outcomes; the effect of access to abortion and birth control methods on socio-economic outcomes of children; and the socio-economic impacts of HIV/AIDS in Africa. His research has been funded by the Spencer Foundation, the National Science Foundation, the World Bank, and has been published in the American Economic Review, the Journal of Political Economy, and the Quarterly Journal of Economics. Prof. Pop-Eleches is a faculty research fellow at the National Bureau of Economic Research and an affiliate of the Bureau for Research and Economic Analysis of Development. He received his Ph.D. in economics from Harvard University in 2003. His CV is available here, and you can find out more about his work on his personal website.

Prof. Pop-Eleches is co-director of the Center for Development Economics and Policy and is head of the Human Capital Initiative.

Tommaso Porzio

Tommaso Porzio is an assistant professor of macroeconomics in the Economics Division at Columbia Business School. His research primarily studies the role of human capital for growth and economic development with a focus on understanding the barriers that may prevent individuals from exploiting their talent.

Tommaso holds a Ph.D. from Yale University and Msc and BA from Bocconi University.

Andrea Prat

Andrea Prat is the Richard Paul Richman Professor of Business at Columbia Business School and Professor of Economics at the Department of Economics, Columbia University. After receiving his PhD in Economics from Stanford University in 1997, he taught at Tilburg University and the London School of Economics. Professor Prat's work focuses on organizational economics and political economy. His current research in organizational economics explores - through theoretical modeling, field experiments, and data analysis - issues such as incentive provision, corporate leadership, employee motivation, and organizational language. His current research in political economy attempts to define and measure the influence of the media industry on the democratic process. He served as Chairman and Managing Editor of the Review of Economic Studies. He is an Associate Editor of Theoretical Economics and a director of the Industrial Organization program of the Center for Economic Policy Research in London. Professor Prat was elected a Fellow of the British Academy in 2011 and a Fellow of the Econometric Society in 2013.

Matthias Schündeln

Matthias Schündeln is Professor of Development Economics at Goethe University Frankfurt, Germany. In recent work he has studied community-based activities, such as community-driven development projects, and the distribution of disaster aid, and their effects on social and environmental outcomes. Other recent work concerns social, political, and economic preferences. He has just received a grant from the German Research Foundation (DFG) to study the effect of climate change on economic and political development in less developed countries. His research has appeared, among others, in the Review of Economic Studies, the Quarterly Journal of Economics, and in Science. Matthias Schündeln received his Ph.D. from Yale University. Prior to moving to Frankfurt, he was an Assistant Professor of Economics and of Social Studies at Harvard University. Additional information can be found on his website.

Rodrigo R. Soares

Rodrigo R. Soares is Lemann Family Foundation Visiting Professor of Brazilian Studies (2022-2025) at Columbia University's School of International and Public Affairs and Lemann Foundation Professor of Economics at Insper, Brazil. From 2016 to 2022, Rodrigo was a tenured full-time faculty at Columbia University's School International and Public Affairs. His research ranges from health, demographic economics, and labor, to crime and institutions. His work has appeared in various scientific journals, including American Economic Review, Journal of Political Economy, Review of Economic Studies, and American Economic Journal: Applied Economics, among various others. Rodrigo is also research fellow at the Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA, Germany), research affiliate at J-PAL Latin America, and associate editor of the Journal of Human Capital, the Journal of Demographic Economics, and the IZA Journal of Development & Migration. He received his Ph.D. in Economics from the University of Chicago in 2002.

Rodrigo is an Elected Fellow of the Econometric Society, an Honorary Member of the LAtin American and Caribbean Economic Association, and a 2006 recipient of the Kenneth J. Arrow Award for the best paper in Health Economics (International Health Economics Association).

Further information is available on his personal web site.

Jan Svejnar

Jan Svejnar is the James T. Shotwell Professor of Global Political Economy and Founding Director of the Center on Global Economic Governance at Columbia University's School of International and Public Affairs. In his research, Professor Svejnar focuses on (a) the effects of foreign investment and government policies on firms and workers, (b) corporate, national and global governance and performance, and (c) entrepreneurship. He is the author and editor of a number of books and has published widely in academic, policy and practitioner-oriented journals, including the American Economic Review, Econometrica, Journal of Economic Literature, Journal of Economic Perspectives, Quarterly Journal of Economics, and Review of Economics and Statistics. He works as an advisor to governments, non-profit organizations and firms, and he serves as Chair of the Supervisory Board of CSOB Bank and Co-Editor of Economics of Transition. He is also Fellow of the European Economic Association, and Research Fellow of the Center for Economic Policy Research (London) and Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA, Bonn).

Prior to joining Columbia University in 2012, Professor Svejnar taught at the University of Michigan, University of Pittsburgh, and Cornell University. He received his B.S. from Cornell University’s School of Industrial and Labor Relations and his M.A. and Ph.D. in Economics from Princeton University.

In 2012, Professor Svejnar was honored with a Neuron Prize for lifelong achievement from the Karel Janeček Endowment for Research and Science. In 2008, Professor Svejnar was one of two candidates for the Presidency of the Czech Republic.

Additional information can be found on his personal website.

Miguel Urquiola

Miguel Urquiola is Professor of Economics and International Affairs at Columbia University.

His research is on the Economics of Education, with a focus on understanding competition between schools and universities.  This includes work on how parents and students select educational providers, and what consequences such choice has on performance.

He is a Research Associate at the National Bureau of Economic Research (NBER), and serves as co-editor of the Journal of Human Resources. He held prior appointments at the Russell Sage Foundation, Cornell University’s economics department, the World Bank’s research department, the Bolivian government, and the Bolivian Catholic University.

He received a B.A. and a Ph.D. in Economics from Swarthmore College and the University of California at Berkeley, respectively.   His CV and further information are on his personal website.

Eric Verhoogen

Eric Verhoogen is Professor of Economics and of International and Public Affairs at Columbia University. His primary research area is industrial development – empirical microeconomic work on firms in developing countries. A common theme is the process of quality upgrading by manufacturing firms, both its causes and its consequences. His work has been published in the Quarterly Journal of Economics, the American Economic Review, the Review of Economic Studies, and other journals. He is currently serving as a Research Program Director of the International Growth Centre and as a member of the Board of Directors of the Bureau for Research in the Economic Analysis of Development (BREAD). He holds a bachelor’s degree from Harvard, a master’s degree from the University of Massachusetts, Amherst, and a Ph.D. in Economics from the University of California at Berkeley. His CV is available here; for more information, see his personal website.

Prof. Verhoogen is co-director of the Center for Development Economics and Policy and is head of the Firms and Innovation Initiative. His current CDEP-affiliated research includes a project on technology spillovers among manufacturing firms in Pakistan, a project on wage premiums paid by Mexican manufacturing firms, and a project on payroll-tax compliance among formal firms in Mexico.

Jack Willis

Jack Willis is an Assistant Professor in the Department of Economics at Columbia University. His research focuses on development economics and its intersection with public economics, behavioral economics and household finance. He holds a B.A. and M.A. in Math from Cambridge University, an M.A. in Economics from the Paris School of Economics, and a Ph.D. in Economics from Harvard University, for which his dissertation was awarded the Padma Desai Prize in Economic Science.

Further information is available on his personal website.