Fellows

CDEP Fellows are advanced students in, or recent graduates from, the SIPA Ph.D. Program in Sustainable Development or the Economics Ph.D. Program at Columbia, whose research is focused on development issues.

Biographies

Ama Baafra Abeberese

Ama Baafra Abeberese is an Assistant Professor of Economics at Wellesley College. Her research is primarily in the areas of industrial development and international trade. Her work focuses on identifying and analyzing constraints faced by firms in developing economies. Her recent work includes investigating the effects of infrastructure-related constraints, including electricity shortages and pricing, and trade-related constraints, including access to imported inputs, on firm behavior. She holds a B.A in Physics and Economics from Wellesley College and a Ph.D. in Economics from Columbia University.

Her CV and further information are available on her personal website.

S Anukriti

S Anukriti is an Assistant Professor in the Economics Department at Boston College and a Research Affiliate of the Institute of the Study of Labor (IZA, Bonn). Her research focuses on topics in development economics, demography, and the economics of gender. In recent work, she has examined the effects macroeconomic policies and financial incentives on fertility and sex-selection in India. Anukriti holds a PhD in Economics from Columbia University, MA in Economics from the Delhi School of Economics, and BA (Honors) in Economics from St. Stephen's College, Delhi.

Her CV and further information can be found on her personal website.

Patrick Asuming

Patrick Asuming is an Associate Research Scientist at the Mailman School of Public Health at Columbia University. His research is primarily in the areas of economics of health and education in developing countries. In his recent work, he used randomized field interventions to understand enrollment decisions in health insurance in Ghana and effect of enrollment in insurance on utilization of health care services and health outcomes. Patrick holds a PhD in Economics from Columbia University, an MPhil in Development Studies from Cambridge University and a BA (Honors) in Economics from the University of Ghana, Legon.

Prabhat Barnwal

Prabhat Barnwal is an Assistant Professor in the Department of Economics at Michigan State University. His research is in development and environment. Prabhat received his Ph.D. from the School of International Affairs at Columbia University in 2015 and was a post doc at University of Chicago during 2016-17. 

His CV and further information are available on his personal website.

 

Ritam Chaurey

Ritam Chaurey is an Assistant Professor of Economics at the State University of New York, Binghamton. His broad research interests are in the fields of development economics and applied microeconomics with a focus on firm behavior and entrepreneurship in developing countries. Ritam holds a Ph.D. in Economics from Columbia University. Prior to his doctoral studies, he completed an MA (Cantab.) from Cambridge University, and a B.A. (Hons) Economics from St. Stephen’s College, Delhi.

His CV and further information are available on his personal website.

Jan Christoph von der Goltz

Jan Christoph von der Goltz is a PhD candidate at the School of International and Public Affairs at Columbia University. His research focus is on the economics of health and the environment in developing countries. In recent work, he studies the local economic and health impact of mining in a large micro data sample from 44 developing countries. Jan holds an MPA degree from Columbia University and an MA from the University of London (SOAS). Before joining Columbia, he worked for the World Bank, the Center for Global Development, and the UN Office on Drugs and Crime.

His CV and further information are available on his personal website.

Anthony D'Agostino

Anthony D'Agostino is a Postdoctoral Fellow at Stanford University's Center on Food Security and the Environment.  His research interests include microeconomic analyses of climate change and understanding the roles of technology and financial instruments in agricultural decision-making.  He holds a PhD in Sustainable Development from Columbia's School of International and Public Affairs, and received a BA in Philosophy from Rutgers University and an MPP from the National University of Singapore.   

His CV and further information are available on his personal web site.

 

Nicolás de Roux

Nicolás de Roux is an Assistant Professor of Economics at Univesidad de los Andes in Bogotá, Colombia. He is an applied microeconomist with a focus on firm behavior and financial markets in developing countries. Nicolás holds a Ph.D. in Economics from Columbia University. He received a B.A. with distinction from Universidad de los Andes in Bogotá and an M.A from the same university.

His CV and further information are available on his personal web site.

Booyuel Kim

Booyuel Kim is an Assistant Professor at KDI (Korea Development Institute) School of Public Policy and Management. Before he joined KDI school, he worked at Earth Institute of Columbia University as a post-doctoral research scholar. He received a Ph.D. in Sustainable Development and a Master of International Affairs from SIPA, Columbia University. His research is in development economics with a focus on health, education, and rural development. 

His CV and further information are on his personal website.

Hyuncheol Bryant Kim

Hyuncheol Bryant Kim is an Assistant Professor in the Department for Policy Analysis and Management at Cornell University. His vision is to love his neighbors and change the world for the better through participatory researches that provide meaningful policy implications. There are two themes in his research. The first is to understand the impact of and behavioral responses to health information and programs. He has investigated cancer screening, general health screening, long term care services and HIV/AIDS prevention programs. The second is to understand human development more fundamentally. Specifically, he is interested in the effect of fetal and early childhood condition on health and socio-economic outcomes in the long-run. He is currently running field projects in Malawi, Ethiopia and Ghana, that will allow him to tackle various issues in health and development economics over the long run. He earned an MD degree from Yonsei University, College of Medicine in 2002, a Master in Economics from Yonsei University in 2005, a Master of Public Health from Seoul National University School of Public Health in 2007, and a PhD in Economics from Columbia University in 2013.

His CV and further information can be found on his personal website.

Corinne Low

Corinne Low is an Assistant Professor of Business Economics and Public Policy at the Wharton School, specializing in family economics and economic development.  Her research brings together applied microeconomic theory with lab and field experiments to understand the determinants of who gets how much across gender and age lines. Current ongoing projects focus on the tradeoff women make between career and family in the US, the impact of teaching girls negotiation skills in Zambia, and how expanded access to in vitro fertilization affects women in Israel.

 

Corinne received her PhD in economics from Columbia University and her undergraduate degree in economics and public policy from Duke University, after which she worked as a consultant for McKinsey and Co. At Wharton, Corinne teaches Managerial Economics in the MBA program. 

Her CV and further information are on her personal website.

Patricia Navarro-Palau

Patricia Navarro-Palau is a Senior Associate at CRA International. She conducts research on the fields of development economics, education economics and labor economics. Particularly, her research focuses on the effects of large-scale policies on education and labor market outcomes. Patricia holds a Ph.D. in Economics from Columbia University, an MSc in Economics from the London School of Economics and a B.A. from Universitat Pompeu Fabra.

Additional information can be found on her CV.

Evan Plous Kresch

Evan Plous Kresch is an Assistant Professor of Economics at Oberlin College. He conducts research in the fields of development economics, public finance, and environmental economics. His current research focuses on the institutional barriers to water & sanitation provision, the health & behavioral effects of natural resource management, and the improvement of public procurement in developing countries. Evan received his Ph.D. and M.A. from Columbia University and a B.A. from the University of California at Berkeley, where he won the Earl Rolph Memorial Prize as the top undergraduate student in his class.

His CV and further information are on his personal website.

Evan Riehl

Evan Riehl is an assistant professor of economics at Cornell University. He received a Ph.D. in economics from Columbia University and a B.A. from Washington University in St. Louis. His research is in labor, education, and development economics with a focus on higher education.

Additional information can be found on his personal website.

Raul Sanchez de la Sierra

Raul is a Ph.D. candidate in Economics at Columbia University. His research investigates the political economy of development and conflict. A general theme of his research is how violence and states shape the process of development. In addition to impact evaluations, he is currently studying the economic effects of state contracts expansion and the economic origins of state-like governance by armed groups in Eastern Congo. He holds a BS. from Carlos III, Madrid, an MS. from Sciences-Po Paris and he has worked for multiple international organizations in Latin America, Africa, and Europe.

His CV and further information are on his personal website.

Yogita Shamdasani

Yogita Shamdasani is an Assistant Professor of Economics at the University of Pittsburgh. Her broad research interests are in the fields of development and labor economics. In recent work, she examines the impact of local road infrastructure on agricultural production. 

Yogita received a B.A with Distinction from Cornell University, and a Ph.D from Columbia University. Her CV and further information can be found on her personal website.

 

Hyelim Son

Hyelim Son is a Ph.D. student in the Department of Economics at Columbia University. Her research focuses on two general topics: human capital investment and impact of public finance policies in developing countries. Hyelim received an M.A and M.Phil from Columbia University and a B.A. from Seoul National University.

Her CV and further information are available on her personal website.

Soule Sow

Soule Sow is a Ph.D. Student in the Department of Economics at Columbia University. His research interests are development economics and international trade. In some of his recent works, he provides a study of quality of life and location preference of urban and rural locations in a developing country context. Other ongoing projects examine manufacturing firms’ behavior after the adoption of value-added taxation in Ethiopia. Soule received an M.A. and M.Phil from Columbia University, and a B.A in mathematics and economics from Colby College.

His CV and further information are available on his personal website.

Mica Sviatschi

Mica is a Ph.D. candidate in Economics at Columbia University. Her research interests are Development Economics, with a primary focus on Education, Labor and Gender issues in Latin America.  A general theme in her thesis is how temporary labor demand shocks can have long term effects on human capital investments. In recent work, she shows that temporary increases in female factory jobs can lead to lasting improvements in female status through general equilibrium effects in the education and marriage markets in the Dominican Republic. Currently, she is studying how increasing the returns to education in Peru can help to mitigate the high economic returns of children in the labor market caused by temporary labor demand increases in child intensive crops. She holds a BS. and MS. from Universidad de San Andres, Buenos Aires and she has worked for the Inter-American Development Bank in Washington DC.

Additional information can be found on her CV.

Anna Tompsett

Anna Tompsett is an Assistant Professor of Economic at Stockholm University. Her research focuses on public goods, their impact on human development, and how political processes influence their provision.  She has a particular interest in infrastructure.  Her research has been funded by the National Science Foundation, the Andrew W. Mellon Foundation, the Alliance Foundation, the Swedish Research Council, the IGC and 3ie. Originally trained as a civil and environmental engineer, she holds an M.Eng. from Imperial College London, an M.Phil. from the University of Cambridge and a Ph.D. in Sustainable Development from Columbia University.  

Further information is available on her personal website.

Laurence Wilse-Samson

Laurence Wilse-Samson is a Ph.D. Candidate in Economics at Columbia University. A general theme of his research is the relationship between political institutions and economic development. He received a B.Sc and a B.Com from the University of Cape Town, an M.Sc from the London School of Economics and Political Science, and a Postgraduate Diploma in European Competition Law from King's College London. He has worked at the United Nations Conference on Trade and Development and NERA Economic Consulting UK.

His CV and further information are on his personal website.