Faculty & Staff

Co-Director, Center for Development Economics and Policy
Co-Director, Center for Development Economics and Policy
Administrative Assistant, Center for Development Economics and Policy

Biographies

Douglas Almond

Douglas Almond is an Associate Professor at Columbia´s School of International and Public Affairs and its Department of Economics. He is also a Research Associate at the National Bureau of Economic Research (NBER). His research focuses on the role of early childhood health in human capital development. Almond studied the health effects of air pollution in China as a Fulbright scholar. He received his BA from Carleton College in Minnesota and Ph.D. from the University of California, Berkeley. Prior to Columbia, he was a postdoctoral fellow in Aging Research at the NBER in Cambridge, MA.

His CV and further information are available on his personal website.

Belinda Archibong

Belinda Archibong is an Assistant Professor of Economics at Barnard College, Columbia University. Her research areas include development economics, political economy and environmental economics with an African regional focus. Her research investigates the determinants and drivers of poverty and inequality of access to energy and public services. Some current work includes studying the persistent effects of historical institutions and geography on access to public services in Nigeria.

She received a B.A. in Economics/Philosophy and a Ph.D. in Sustainable Development from Columbia University. Her CV and further information can also be found on her personal website.

Alex Eble

Alex Eble is Assistant Professor of Economics and Education at Teachers College, Columbia University. He is an applied microeconomist, and his research focuses primarily on the economics of education in developing countries. He currently has active research projects in China, India, Gambia, and Guinea-Bissau, and can speak and read Mandarin Chinese. He received his his BA from Indiana University, Bloomington, MSc from the London School of Economics, and PhD in economics from Brown University.

His CV and further information are available on his personal website.

 

François Gerard

François Gerard is Assistant Professor of Economics at the Department of Economics. His research focuses on public economics and development –the design and impact of government policies in middle-income and developing countries. He holds a Master in Economics and a Complementary Degree in Economics and Social Ethics from the Catholic University of Louvain (Belgium) and a Ph.D. in Economics from the University of California at Berkeley.

His CV and further information are on his personal website.

Jonas Hjort

Jonas Hjort is Assistant Professor of Economics and Finance at the Graduate School of Business and an affiliated faculty member of the Department of Economics at Columbia University. His research focuses on firms and labor markets in developing countries, as well as on human capital accumulation. He holds a BSc from the London School of Economics, an MA from Yale and a Ph.D. from the University of California at Berkeley.

His CV and further information are available on his personal website

Sarah Holloway

Sarah Holloway is a serial social entrepreneur who has started a half dozen ventures in K-12 education including MOUSE and CSNYC. Sarah is a member of the SIPA faculty where she teaches Nonprofit Financial Management in the school’s core curriculum and Social Entrepreneurship In addition to teaching, she runs SIPA’s Management Specialization – a set of courses and activities that support knowledge and skill building in nonprofit, for-profit and social enterprise management. Sarah is a member the Boards of Directors of the NYC Foundation for Computer Science Education (CSNYC), The Armory Foundation, Mission Restore, Columbia Entrepreneurship and FiveOne Labs. Sarah received a Bachelor's degree from Bowdoin College and a Masters in Public Administration (MPA) from SIPA.

 

Macartan Humphreys

Macartan Humphreys is a Professor of Political Science at Columbia University. He works on the political economy of development and formal political theory. His ongoing research focuses on civil wars, post-conflict development, ethnic politics, natural resource management, political authority and leadership, and democratic development with a current focus on the use of field experiments to study democratic decision-making in post-conflict and developing areas. He has conducted field research in Chad, Ghana, Haiti, Indonesia, Liberia, Mali, Sao Tome and Principe, Sierra Leone, Senegal, Uganda, and elsewhere. His work has appeared in the American Political Science Review, World Politics, the Economic Journal, and elsewhere. He has authored or coauthored books on ethnic politics, natural resource management, and game theory and politics. He is the Executive Director of the Experiments in Governance and Politics research network and a former Trudeau fellow and scholar of the Harvard Academy. He received his Ph.D. from Harvard University in 2003.

His CV and further information are available on his personal website.

Supreet Kaur

Supreet Kaur is an Assistant Professor in the Department of Economics and the School of International and Public Affairs at Columbia University. Her research is on labor markets in developing countries, with two strands of focus. The first is to examine how labor market failures distort employment, production, and other outcomes in developing countries. The second is to use insights from behavioral economics to understand why wages, unemployment, and organizational structures look the way they do. She holds a B.S. in Operations Research from Columbia University, an M.P.A. in International Development (MPA/ID) from Harvard University, and a Ph.D. from Harvard University. She has been awarded the David A. Wells Prize by the Harvard Economics Department (2012). She was selected as a Dissertation Fellow at the Project on Justice, Welfare, and Economics (2009-2010) and a Giorgio Ruffolo Doctoral Fellow in Sustainability Science (2010-2011) at Harvard. Her work has received financial support from the National Science Foundation and USAID.

Her CV and further information are available on her personal website.

Amit Khandelwal

Amit Khandelwal is Gary Winnick and Martin Granoff Associate Professor of Business at Columbia Business School. His research focuses on the link between international trade and economic development. He has authored several studies on the impact of trade liberalization on manufacturing activity in China and India, and is currently running two field experiments on export promotion and industrial policy in Egypt and Pakistan. He teaches International Business and International Seminars on the Chinese and Indian economies. Prof. Khandelwal is affiliated with the National Bureau of Economic Research, the International Growth Centre and the Bureau for Research and Economic Analysis of Development. He holds a Ph.D. in economics from Yale University.

His CV and further information are on his personal website.

Paul Lagunes

Paul Lagunes is an assistant professor at Columbia University’s School of International and Public Affairs. His research focuses on corruption, especially as it affects subnational governments in the Americas. Lagunes is currently studying corruption in infrastructure projects in Peru’s municipal governments, and teaches the master’s-level course “Local and Global Corruption: Maneuvering Toward Good Governance.” He obtained his Ph.D. in political science from Yale University.

His CV and further information are available on his personal website.

W. Bentley Macleod

W. Bentley MacLeod is Sami Mnaymneh Professor of Economics, Professor of International and Public Affairs, and an affiliated Law Faculty at Columbia University. He is a specialist in law, labor and contract economics, with a focus on how incentives are designed to take into account the complex interplay between reputation effects, market competition, and social norms. MacLeod has been a fellow of the Econometric Society since 2005 and a fellow of the Society of Labor Economists since 2012. His work has been published in the Rand Journal of Economics, the Quarterly Journal of Economics, the Journal of Economic Literature, and the American Economic Review, among others. MacLeod holds a B.A. (with distinction) and a M.Sc. in mathematics from Queen's University, Kingston, Canada and a Ph.D. in economics from the University of British Columbia, Vancouver, Canada.

His CV and further information are available on his personal website

Suresh Naidu

Suresh Naidu is Assistant Professor of Economics and International Affairs at Columbia University, with a joint appointment in the School of International and Public Affairs and the Department of Economics. His primary research area is political economy, with a particular interest in markets and economic conflict in non-democratic environments. His CV is available here; for more information, see his personal website.

His current CDEP-affiliated research includes the cross-country economic effects of democratization, politics of trade in Haiti, a project on migrant worker contracts in the UAE, as well as ongoing research on the economic history of American labor markets.

Cristian (Kiki) Pop-Eleches

Cristian (Kiki) Pop-Eleches is an Associate Professor of Economics and International Affairs at Columbia's School of International and Public Affairs. He is an applied empirical economist whose research area is international education and health. His work explores how the quality and type of schools and school inputs affect educational and labor market outcomes; the effect of access to abortion and birth control methods on socio-economic outcomes of children; and the socio-economic impacts of HIV/AIDS in Africa. His research has been funded by the Spencer Foundation, the National Science Foundation, the World Bank, and has been published in the American Economic Review, the Journal of Political Economy, and the Quarterly Journal of Economics. Prof. Pop-Eleches is a faculty research fellow at the National Bureau of Economic Research and an affiliate of the Bureau for Research and Economic Analysis of Development. He received his Ph.D. in economics from Harvard University in 2003. His CV is available here, and you can find out more about his work on his personal website.

Prof. Pop-Eleches is co-director of the Center for Development Economics and Policy and is head of the Human Capital Initiative.

Andrea Prat

Andrea Prat is Richard Paul Richman Professor of Business at the Graduate School of Business and Professor of Economics at the Department of Economics, Columbia University. After receiving his Ph.D. in Economics from Stanford University in 1997, he taught at Tilburg University and the London School of Economics. He is the Chairman of the Editorial Board of the Review of Economic Studies and director of the Industrial Organization program of the Centre for Economic Policy Research. Professor Prat's work focuses on organizational economics and political economy. His current research explores - through theoretical modelling, field and lab experiments, and data analysis- issues related to incentive provision, firm structure, and communication modes. Professor Prat is a principal investigator of the Executive Time Use Project. He is the author of numerous articles on leading journals in economics and finance including the American Economic Review, Econometrica, the Journal of Finance, the Quarterly Journal of Economics, the Review of Economic Studies, and the Review of Financial Studies. Professor Prat is Fellow of the British Academy.

His CV and additional information can be found on his personal website.

Rodrigo R. Soares

Rodrigo R. Soares is Lemann Professor of Brazilian Public Policy and International and Public Affairs at Columbia's School of International and Public Affairs. His research focuses on development economics, ranging from labor, human capital, and demographic economics, to crime. His work has appeared in various scientific journals, including American Economic Review, Journal of Political Economy, Journal of Public Economics, and Journal of Development Economics, among various others. Rodrigo is also research fellow at the Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA, Germany), research affiliate at J-PAL Latin America, and associate editor of the Journal of Human Capital, of the Journal of Demographic Economics, and of the IZA Journal of Labor & Development. He received his Ph.D. in Economics from the University of Chicago in 2002.

Before joining Columbia, Rodrigo taught at the Sao Paulo School of Economics-FGV, PUC-Rio, the University of Maryland, and the Harvard School of Public Health. In 2006, he was awarded the Kenneth J. Arrow Award from the International Health Economics Association for the best paper published in the field of Health Economics.

Further information is available on his personal web site.

Jan Svejnar

Jan Svejnar is the James T. Shotwell Professor of Global Political Economy and Founding Director of the Center on Global Economic Governance at Columbia University's School of International and Public Affairs. In his research, Professor Svejnar focuses on (a) the effects of foreign investment and government policies on firms and workers, (b) corporate, national and global governance and performance, and (c) entrepreneurship. He is the author and editor of a number of books and has published widely in academic, policy and practitioner-oriented journals, including the American Economic Review, Econometrica, Journal of Economic Literature, Journal of Economic Perspectives, Quarterly Journal of Economics, and Review of Economics and Statistics. He works as an advisor to governments, non-profit organizations and firms, and he serves as Chair of the Supervisory Board of CSOB Bank and Co-Editor of Economics of Transition. He is also Fellow of the European Economic Association, and Research Fellow of the Center for Economic Policy Research (London) and Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA, Bonn).

Prior to joining Columbia University in 2012, Professor Svejnar taught at the University of Michigan, University of Pittsburgh, and Cornell University. He received his B.S. from Cornell University’s School of Industrial and Labor Relations and his M.A. and Ph.D. in Economics from Princeton University.

In 2012, Professor Svejnar was honored with a Neuron Prize for lifelong achievement from the Karel Janeček Endowment for Research and Science. In 2008, Professor Svejnar was one of two candidates for the Presidency of the Czech Republic.

Additional information can be found on his personal website.

Anja Tolonen

Anja Tolonen is an Assistant Professor of Economics at Barnard College, Columbia University. She works on economic development. Her recent work focuses on the local welfare effects of natural resource extraction in Africa, including employment, women’s empowerment, health and criminality. She teaches Development Economics, and Women in Development Economics at Barnard College.  Prof. Tolonen is an external research member at Oxford Center for Analysis of Resource Rich Economies (OxCarre), UNESCO has funded her research and she has consultancy experience from the World Bank. She received her Ph.D. from University of Gothenburg in 2015 and has been a visiting researcher at University of Oxford and University of California at Berkeley.

Additional information can be found on her web site.

Miguel Urquiola

Miguel Urquiola is Professor of Economics and International Affairs at Columbia University.

His research is on the Economics of Education, with a focus on understanding competition between schools and universities.  This includes work on how parents and students select educational providers, and what consequences such choice has on performance.

He is a Research Associate at the National Bureau of Economic Research (NBER), and serves as co-editor of the Journal of Human Resources. He held prior appointments at the Russell Sage Foundation, Cornell University’s economics department, the World Bank’s research department, the Bolivian government, and the Bolivian Catholic University.

He received a B.A. and a Ph.D. in Economics from Swarthmore College and the University of California at Berkeley, respectively.   His CV and further information are on his personal website.

Eric Verhoogen

Eric Verhoogen is Professor of Economics and International Affairs and Vice Dean of the School of International and Public Affairs at Columbia University. His primary research area is industrial development – empirical microeconomic work on firms in developing countries. A common theme is the process of quality upgrading by manufacturing firms, both its causes and its consequences. His work has been published in the Quarterly Journal of Economics, the American Economic Review, the Review of Economic Studies, and other journals. He is currently serving as a Research Program Director of the International Growth Centre and as a member of the Board of Directors of the Bureau for Research in the Economic Analysis of Development (BREAD). He holds a bachelor’s degree from Harvard, a master’s degree from the University of Massachusetts, Amherst, and a Ph.D. in Economics from the University of California at Berkeley. His CV is available here; for more information, see his personal website.

Prof. Verhoogen is co-director of the Center for Development Economics and Policy and is head of the Firms and Innovation Initiative. His current CDEP-affiliated research includes a project on technology spillovers among manufacturing firms in Pakistan, a project on wage premiums paid by Mexican manufacturing firms, and a project on payroll-tax compliance among formal firms in Mexico.